We love NPS!

einstein-everything-simple

We love NPS. It’s simple. We started measuring NPS (Net Promoter Score) right after reading Fred Reichheld’s December 2003 Harvard Business Review article. LOVE NPS!   It is a great “North Star” for getting company-wide focus on the member (customer) experience. It remains one of our company’s four main KPIs. The target for our health clubs is to maintain a Trailing 90 Day NPS > 70.

But we learned quickly that to really enable the management of the member experience we needed to better understand the member experience. The “likelihood to recommend” question was a great start. But it hid many of our company’s shortcomings as it wasn’t an accurate representation of the entire MEMBER JOURNEY. By itself, it didn’t uncover our members’ deeper ideas, concerns and even valuable praise. We also struggled with accountability – How do I, as a front desk team member, ACCOUNT for my impact on our NPS?

When companies deploy an NPS only approach to Operational Customer Experience Management (OCEM), we see it result in a series of tactics to find “Detractors” and to mitigate their risk of cancelling. This tactical approach to OCEM returns only a fraction of the value one should be leveraging when going through the trouble of collecting member feedback. It also does not reveal the issues (sometimes major issues) your Promoters have with your company.

The first rule of OCEM is to really see yourself as the member sees you. You need metrics that you can track to their entire journey and once they give you that quantitative feedback, they are now primed to give you richer qualitative feedback.

For example, while I am writing this I reviewed feedback from a “Promoter”. This person gave a 10 on Likelihood to Recommend (LTR). They gave their reason as “Great club! Super clean.” Okay, if those are the only questions I allowed her to answer then our job with her is done! But read on. Once this SAME MEMBER had a chance to reflect on (and score) her whole journey, she added the following: “I have had 3 trainers. One left after 2 sessions, the next one was fired after we trained for several months and the third was promoted to another club within one month of us training, Very discouraging. No continuity. Why would I buy another series?” THAT is the information I needed.  Buried in her journey was a major issue. Now, instead of the false pat-on-the-back we would have given ourselves, we have uncovered an issue. In fact this may not be a small issue. Conducting root cause on this might reveal a HUGE opportunity to improve the experience for all of the personal training clients.  But if you are only asking the LTR question and “what was your reason?” you are not getting the value you need.

But we are still talking about tactics. What about your strategy? In order for you to be successful with your strategy, do you need to have a customer service oriented culture? Chances are, if you are in the fitness business the answer is “yes.”

The challenge with an NPS only program is that is very hard to move your customer-centric plans from being just ink on paper to the blood in the veins of your entire team. Getting the feedback to align with the member journey so that every team member takes ownership of the customer experience is how to make that happen.

Enter the science of great technology, survey design and a systematic approach for closing-the-loop, fixing individual issues, performing root-cause analysis and building culture.

The member experience is a complex thing to understand. It should not be treated as a transaction. When done right this complexity can be presented in simple and beautiful ways that engage your entire company. I started with Einstein and will finish with Oliver Wendell Holmes – “I wouldn’t give a fig for simplicity on this side of complexity. But I would give my right arm for simplicity on the other side of complexity.”

This blog was originally published Nov. 24, 2015 by Blair McHaney. We hope it fires you up to start really understanding what your members think about you.

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Start with a smile

Today I did an informal experiment. As I was riding my bike to work, I decided to count how many people either returned my smile or said good morning/hello or some other acknowledgement (even a head nod!). No, it wasn’t too early and it was a gorgeous day! Apple Capital Loop Trail– I live in an amazingly beautiful area with a bike path that connects two towns on either side of the Columbia River. Along the way, it is quite normal to see eagle, osprey, fish jumping, salmon fisherman fishing, and even some other unsightly creatures (snakes, skunk).

In other words, the reasons to be happy, to be smiling, to be friendly were numerous! We are alive, we are able bodied enough to be outside enjoying the beauty and breathing clean, fresh air!

Back to my experiment: my trip to work is only about 45 minutes of brisk biking but I passed no less than 47 people. I am not counting the ones who were plugged in or chatting away with others and, therefore, would not hear my cheery voice. 47 people (plus the others with headphones or friends)! Isn’t that amazing? So many people up and exercising and enjoying the outdoors. Guess how many people smiled back at me? Or acknowledged me in any way? 13. Yes, only 13 – roughly 26% I was overly cheery and loud with my greetings and still – only 13. That makes me wonder: what is going on in their minds that they are choosing to not be present? (Perhaps they thought I was a bit loony or “one of those annoyingly happy morning people?)

Which leads me to this article – how often do we go throughout our day not being present?be present What are we missing by letting our minds run ahead? How many people do we not connect with by not paying attention to our surroundings and missing the best parts of our day? It’s so easy to get absorbed in what we have to get done, our stresses, or our life but by not being present, we might miss that open door to the next greatest opportunity. Even the missed opportunity to really “see” and acknowledge some really great people!

Do you know WHO those 13 people were? They were the ‘seniors’ (older than me!) who I suspect were out there because: 1) they had the time 2) they enjoyed the beauty of the outdoors or even 3) perhaps they wanted to make someone’s day better by offering a hello or a smile. I can see their smiles, the look of peace and contentment. For me, they reminded me just how much a smile means. They made my day brighter.

Even if you don’t have the opportunity to ride a bike to work or don’t live in a place that is beautiful, there is still joy in being alive and being in the moment. Take a look around – I’m sure you can find at least one thing to smile about?

A smile is easy. A smile is cheap. A smile can make someone’s day. The best gift you can give yourself is to make someone’s day brighter by offering a free smile. Enjoy!

How do you practice being present? What makes it hard for you to be present? Please share with us.

This blog was originally published Oct. 2, 2015 and was so good the first time that you just have to see it again, courtesy of Jenny Hymer. Enjoy!

Weighting out the winter

 

Winter is here and your members and future members are evaluating their fitness right now! They are considering their gym memberships and resolving in their minds to really get serious this next year. set goal, make plan, work, stick to it, reach goal - a success cThis is great for business but the challenge is always how to retain more of these people before they get discouraged and move on or just stop coming in.

Here is something to think about.

Do you know what fitness goals your member’s have? How would you know if they met their goals? If you are a health club operator You should absolutely know this information. Knowing what your members are trying to accomplish is key to connecting them with the right services and keeping them as members long term. If you could keep each member from cancelling even for an additional 2-3 months, how much additional revenue is that?

Here are a couple of ways to learn about your members fitness goals.

  1. Start with asking people when they first become a member. Try this, “Tell me what you are hoping to accomplish with this membership?” Hold the assumptions and give them a few minutes to answer. It is amazing what a few thoughtful well designed questions can produce. It should be no surprise that many people will be eager to tell you about their fitness goals. If they are sitting in a sales office at your health club, they will assume that you are an expert and will be able to advise them how to meet their goals. Capture what they have shared with you so that your trainers and management can access this information. Your engagement with this member should be driven by a desire to see them succeed.
  2. Another way to understand a member’s fitness goals is via a survey. The right member experience management system can provide you with an opportunity to engage personally with your member about their fitness goals and to learn how you can help. Soliciting regular feedback from members is the only way to know if you are actually providing them with what you promised when they first joined you club.

Here are just some of the things your members could be trying to accomplish.

  • Lose weight
  • Gain weight
  • Train for a race
  • Recover from surgery
  • Make new friends
  • Start dating
  • Need a break from their kids
  • and many more reasons

Take the time to understand what your members are trying to accomplish. A few respectful and thoughtful questions will go a long way towards keeping that member engaged and active at your club.

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Are you doing anything to understand and track fitness results at your club? Let us know!

It’s a Tuesday to You but a Lifetime to Them

I have only been in the health club industry for about 7 months now, not long at all compared to the people around me. That doesn’t add a whole lot of weight to my words (no pun intended) does it? So why take to heart the things I’m about to tell you? In the practical sense I have about 30 years of firsthand experience in the weight loss/health and wellness industry as a consumer. I grew up overweight, was that awkward kid that ate cereal out of a coffee mug so no one would know – sometimes food was my only friend. I blossomed into a heavy teenager, compensating for my looks with a sharp wit and an intense desire to please everyone around me. “She’s so nice, has such a great personality.” Yeah, I was that girl. On to my young adult years, I was up to almost 350 pounds. It wasn’t like the movies, there was no montage with a sad soundtrack that fast forwarded through my weight gain. I was present in every moment. Every bite, every time I drove the three blocks to work instead of walking, every time I told myself – Monday. I’ll start Monday. New Year’s is coming, I’ll eat what I want until New Years, then I’ll change everything. It’s Thanksgiving though, who wants to eat healthy during Thanksgiving? It’s my birthday! No one will mind if I eat half the cake, and so forth. A lot of you won’t be able to relate, and that’s ok. I used to be the exception, but unfortunately in this day and age my story is starting to become the rule.

At this point I should probably tell you that on August 24th, 2016, I reached my first milestone of 100 lbs lost. Yay me! How it happened… it wasn’t easy. I bounced from gym to gym searching for that golden epiphany for years, but was always turned off by the cold tiger_mountain_trailand empty feeling that I was just a mark on the dues line for the membership counselors and trainers I interacted with. Nothing stuck, there was no personal connection. I finally moved to Alaska for work at the end of 2010. I know our current and potential members aren’t going to move to Alaska and start hiking, it obviously won’t work for everyone, but it worked for me. I was in love! Not with a person, but with a state, and a new state of being. I could pick a trail, and just walk. At first it was the hardest thing I’ve ever done, I could barely walk up a single flight of stairs, but I put one foot in front of the other and got started.

I finally had my turning moment a few years ago. I was on a trail, embarrassingly easy for most people, but hell on earth for me. I was sweating profusely, panting, and walking so slow that it hardly felt like moving at all. Then I heard a voice behind me. “Keep it up! You’re doing great, good for you!” A very fit man on a mountain bike flew past me, giving me a thumbs up as he went. For whatever reason having a random stranger take just a moment to throw some encouraging words my way meant more than a lifetime of people who really loved me saying the same things. It was just a regular moment for mountain bike guy, a Tuesday if you will, but it meant everything to me. I picked up my speed, hiking harder and higher than ever before. My entire life changed after that. It hasn’t been easy, I still struggle on a daily basis, but I will never forget that moment, my catalyst.

That’s why I got into the business after all this time. I want to give my members those moments – just a second of contact that might change everything for them. I want to be that shift in their state of being, pass on the gift that was given to me. Medallia is the perfect vehicle for that change! When I went to Chicago for the MXM Institute I figured it would be a good introduction to the system, how to run the mechanics of the software, how to process the survey responses, help my team with reports and metrics, etc. I had no idea that the entire focus would be the customer experience and how to elevate it. I was enthralled the entire time, surrounded by industry people who genuinely cared about their members. We were there shoulder to shoulder, absorbing all of the information given in an effort to make sure we are providing the best possible environment to foster health and wellbeing. Medallia is a great conduit, the best way to have open and honest conversations with our members. They are talking loud and clear, and thanks to the program we get the opportunity to listen, process, and in turn provide those moments that could be life changing.  If you get the chance to go to the institute, please do. It is your opportunity to get refreshed and reconnected with the reason you got into the industry in the first place. You’ll go home afterwards knowing that it may only be an average Tuesday in your club, the 100th time you answered the same question, the 100th time you caught the eyes of a member and gave an encouraging smile, but it might be a lifetime to the people you’re here to help.

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This blog is courtesy of one of our clients, Cheri Terhorst, the Member Relations Coordinator at Club Northwest in Grants Pass, OR. We made Cheri’s acquaintance at our inaugural MXM Institute in Chicago.

Free Webinar: The Four Habits of Exceptional Clubs

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Exceptional clubs don’t happen by accident, and they appear in every strata of the marketplace – low-price, mid-price and high-price. Their common denominator is the conscious choice to make customer experience their strategy and the adoption of the habits that make it successful.

Learn what “exceptional” really means and how you can put your club(s) on the “exceptional” path. If you want to learn how many of the world’s best companies, including fitness organizations, drive customer experience strategy, this webinar is for you – regardless of the size of your organization.

PRESENTER
Blair McHaney, president, ClubWorks Inc.


Blair McHaney is the former vice president of strategic initiatives for Medallia, an operational customer experience management (OCEM) technology company. He is a subject matter expert on operationalizing voice of customer systems, a Medallia Institute educator, a club owner for more than 30 years and president of ClubWorks, which is Medallia’s partner for operational customer experience management in the fitness industry.

Register Here

Medallia Experience 2016

The ClubWorks team had an amazing time in Orlando for the 2016 Medallia Experience.
If you’re curious to get to better know the theme of the conference — Generation CX — check out the video below. This video kicked off the conference and speaks to the power of today’s customers. We hope it resonates with you. And if it does, we’d love it if you shared it with friends and family, on social media and beyond.

I had a fantasy while flying to Orlando…

Alaska Airlines flight 16, seat 8F.  Heading to Orlando.  Medallia’s annual event is always incredibly stimulating and fun.   But right now I am waiting for someone to pick up the remains of my small “Tapas” snack to allow me a little more room to type.  If only my forearms were 3 inches shorter I could type without deforming my hands.   It seems that every flight in the last few years has been 100% booked.  This must be very good as far as I can tell for the airlines.

crowded-plane

But let’s forget about what is good for the airlines for a minute and just think about the experience of flying and how one might design a far better flying experience.  There are 178 seats on this flight, 12 of them in first class.  I wonder what the math looks like if instead of every coach row having 6 seats, every row had 4.  And instead of 27 coach rows they were reduced to 24.  Removing some 66 seats or 37% of the capacity.  How much more would the airline need to charge per ticket in order to have higher margin than they have now?  How much more would the customer be willing to pay?  How many of these customers are out there?   Would the price of a seat need to be the same as it currently is for a first class ticket?   It doesn’t seem so.  First class tickets (of course I am not talking about free upgrades) are priced 2-4 times a coach ticket.  I have no idea what the calculus is for determining all of the different fares but they seem quite varied.

With the removal of 37% of the seats could the airline charge 50-60% more for the ticket?  It sure seems like there would be a market for this.  At least the math works if the customers are there.  GOOD LORD I would buy that deal all damn day even if it didn’t come with free food and beverage!  It seems it would AT LEAST be worth an experiment.  Every airline seems to be chasing the exact same space – make more money by crowding more people in.   This assumes that what people value is simply cheaper fares and moderate service. I wonder what would happen if an airline decided to attract people who value SPACE and excellent service.

Here is what the boarding experience might sound like:

“Hello folks, this is a completely full flight today but no worries, you are flying our new ‘Respect Class’ and there is no need to be anxious about overhead space as you are guaranteed to have your very own space over your designated seat!”   

“You will also enjoy 7 inch wider seats, 7 degrees more recline and 4 inches more leg room than our standard flight.  The center isle is 24 inches instead of 18 inches so you can avoid those awkward moments to and from the lavatory when you must decide which side of your body you will thrust into the face of the poor bastard in the isle seat in order that another passenger may pass.”   

“Speaking of lavatories! Ours are occupied on average 37% less and are 6 inches wider than standard in order to prevent those painful shoulder dislocations required in most airplane lavatories.” 

“Your Internet connection will be 37% better and we predict you are 37% more likely to have an outstanding experience. If you do, please don’t be shy about posting comments out there!”

“Also, since there are far fewer of you, boarding and deplaning takes about half the time as our standard flights.”    

Okay, that’s my fantasy and if you have flown much lately you know why this is my fantasy!  There are certainly exceptions to the “always bad to mediocre experience” and they seem to occur when I fly Virgin America, or I buy (or get upgraded) to first class.  It is amazing how much better the flying experience can actually be.

flying first class

Now think about your health club.   People experience the same anxieties in overly crowded clubs as one does on overly crowded flights.  Things like attending a class, getting into Team Training, having an open treadmill, finding a vacant locker, taking a shower, having kids get the attention needed in the Kids Club, all of these things have increased value when a club is not over-crowded.  My hunch is that with the proliferation of high-volume/low-price clubs, there may be an opportunity for growth in the higher-price and more-space model.  How might you capitalize on having all your members fly “Respect Class” instead of what coach class is becoming?   Look, I sure don’t have the answer here.  I am just positing the question.  But I do know that I’d pay for this flying experience every time.